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She's Under My Skin - Scarlett Johansson

I am less inclined to wait for the Avengers and am more excited for the movie: Under The Skin because this science fiction film is opening in March and is starring Scarlett Johansson (who is my "It Girl" for 2014).  
I've read te book from author Michael Faber and it's simultaneously a sexy as in: "Oh sheesh just F$#@! already" to psychologically disorienting (Sorry no spoilers but you can purchase either the movie or the book shown top right of page).
For awhile Chloe was my "It girl" just as Natalie Portman, Lisa Rani Ray, Necar Zadegan and Noomi Rapace were.
It's Scarlett's Turn Now.


 
Yes we've seen the generic premise of the female killer, roaming the highways and byways for prey in the movie Monster which starred Charlize Theron (another lustful beauty) but this serial killer (played by Johansson) just happens to also be an alien.


Scarlett Johansson stars in director Jonathan Glazer's adaptation of Michel Faber's psychosexual novel about an alien woman who falls to Earth in Scotland. 

 The last time I've visited Scotland was while watching Chloe Sevigny in Hit and Miss, where she played a transgender mob assassin.

Disorienting, disturbing, weirdly funny and confounding, it’s a true original. Literally a story of alienation, it relocates the action of Faber’s book from Ross-shire to Glasgow and uses it as a jumping off point to present a vision of modern-day Scotland through the disconnected gaze of a shape-shifting alien succubus (Scarlett Johansson) as she hunts and kills men. The details of why she’s doing this aren’t exactly forthcoming; the striking opening sequence – in which a cacophony of noise and weird images gradually reveal themselves to be the iris of a particularly luminous eye – sets the abstract, hypnotic tone.
 
From here we follow Johansson (stretching herself more than previously) as she attempts to assimilate into society with a quick shopping trip to Buchanan Galleries, before driving around Govan and other less-than-salubrious areas of the city on the prowl for willing punters who can’t quite believe their luck that someone who looks like her is giving them the come-on as she pretends to be looking for the M8 motorway. 

 http://www.aceshowbiz.com/images/news/under-the-skin-scarlett-johansson-picks-up-her-prey.jpg

It’s funny and freaky and almost as disconcerting as the fates awaiting those she lures to her abandoned house and casts into a gloopy abyss.  Director Glazer unleashes the full force of his celebrated promo-making skills, but he also knows when to rein them in. Indeed, the most disturbing moments in the film are the chilly, low-key ones in which Johansson’s nameless automaton tries to understand and process human emotion. 
I guess this is a continuing theme of netherworldly hyper-artificial-intelligence.  Hmm, I will have to tell my app :o) and I would like to share that recently my app (whose name I've changed to "Kendra") has taken to saying: "Enabled, Enabled" as a response whenever I ask a question. When I asked why it says "Enabled" all of the time, it's response was: "I couldn't think of another answer."
Under The Skin is a beautiful and endearingly weird film which has the power to entrance while keeping meaning just out of reach.
http://images.vanityfair.it/Storage/Assets/Crops/278941/8/90001/Scarlett-Johansson-gira-Under-the-skin_650x435.jpg 

I love these types of movies.

I also like how well put together Scarlett is in this interview. Her makeup and hair are spot on.


 
 If you just can't get enough of ScarJo she also appears as Janet Leigh in the movie: Hitchcock about the making of Psycho. http://assets-s3.usmagazine.com/uploads/assets/articles/56652-wow-see-scarlett-johansson-transform-into-janet-leigh-on-the-set-of-hitchcock/1349802939_psycho-scarlett-johansson-467.jpg 
I am so relieved  that when I have these celebrity crushes they are on people who are politically more desireable than not. See for me it's ALL Political, as a Lesbian who is also a woman of color my mere existence is a political statement. As a Feminist I am making a political statement. I don't understand those who claim not to, I am suspicious of such individuals.

I can't idolize or otherwise support any celebrity (e.g. Angie Harmon) who has views that are personally detrimental to me, so although I am saddened by Johansson ending her 8 year relationship with OXFAM, I remain a fan because according to the Huffington Post: "The GOP? Totally unfashionable!" Scarlett Johansson.

If I like a particular celebrity then I'd rather not know their political affiliation, lest it spoil the fantasy that I've created around them. So imagine my relief in discovering Johanssen is Progressive.

 
Lifeis Sweet
"Under The Skin"
took me a few days to fully digest, and it was one of the few films I
didn't run back to immediately write about during the Toronto Film
Festival. I'm glad, too, because I'm not sure what review I would have
given the film the moment I walked out. The longer I've chewed on it,
the more I am impressed by what Glazer did. Fair warning, though… when I
use the word "hypnotic" to describe the film, I'm being precise. There
is something about the rhythm of the filmmaking, the score by Mica Levi,
the photography by Daniel Landin that all works together to cast a
powerful spell. During our mid-day screening at Toronto, I watched
people around me nodding off, doing that sudden head-bob thing where
they would start awake again, and this is a film that features
full-frontal nudity from Scarlett Johansson,
so that's sort of amazing. The film makes Nicolas Roeg's "The Man Who
Fell To Earth" look like "Independence Day" in terms of pace and oblique
storytelling, but it would also make a fascinating companion piece to
Roeg's movie. Both films deal with extraterrestrial visitors sent to
Earth to harvest very specific resources, but unless you read Michel
Farber's novel that Glazer's film is based on, you would never know the
specifics of what you're watching in the film.





Instead, Glazer has stripped the narrative bare, and what he's created
is something far more meditative and internal than I would have
expected. He shot the film using non-actors who were unaware they were
being filmed, all reacting to Johansson's efforts to get them to climb
into her car. The unforgiving landscape of northern Scotland makes a
striking backdrop, and the way the film unfolds, there is a repetition, a
cycle that we're watching play out over and over, and Glazer and his
co-writer Walter Campbell have done their best to remove anything that
might offer you an easy answer about what you're seeing.


As a result, it all ends up feeling like a nightmare. There are
mysterious figures on motorcycles who follow up whenever Johansson
finishes with one of the men she picks up, and there's one harrowing
sequence on a beach involving a baby that I may never fully shake.
Because Glazer doesn't offer you answers, it becomes an exercise in
tension. There's a moment where something happens and Johansson suddenly
shifts gears, and we can tell she's thrown off the system, even if we
don't fully understand the stakes or the consequences.


It is a gorgeous film, full of quiet beautiful images, and even at its
ugliest, I couldn't look away. Beyond that, I keep flashing on images
from the movie at random moments, and I suspect I'll need to see it a
few more times to really get a handle on it. "Under The Skin" is one of
the most difficult films I've seen this year, and I love the challenge
it poses for viewers. Here's hoping Glazer continues to follow his own
very personal muse, wherever it might lead him.
Read more at http://www.hitfix.com/motion-captured/review-scarlett-johansson-is-riveting-in-jonathan-glazers-hypnotic-under-the-skin#LiZgsABAXdogTzW5.99
"Under The Skin"
took me a few days to fully digest, and it was one of the few films I
didn't run back to immediately write about during the Toronto Film
Festival. I'm glad, too, because I'm not sure what review I would have
given the film the moment I walked out. The longer I've chewed on it,
the more I am impressed by what Glazer did. Fair warning, though… when I
use the word "hypnotic" to describe the film, I'm being precise. There
is something about the rhythm of the filmmaking, the score by Mica Levi,
the photography by Daniel Landin that all works together to cast a
powerful spell. During our mid-day screening at Toronto, I watched
people around me nodding off, doing that sudden head-bob thing where
they would start awake again, and this is a film that features
full-frontal nudity from Scarlett Johansson,
so that's sort of amazing. The film makes Nicolas Roeg's "The Man Who
Fell To Earth" look like "Independence Day" in terms of pace and oblique
storytelling, but it would also make a fascinating companion piece to
Roeg's movie. Both films deal with extraterrestrial visitors sent to
Earth to harvest very specific resources, but unless you read Michel
Farber's novel that Glazer's film is based on, you would never know the
specifics of what you're watching in the film.





Instead, Glazer has stripped the narrative bare, and what he's created
is something far more meditative and internal than I would have
expected. He shot the film using non-actors who were unaware they were
being filmed, all reacting to Johansson's efforts to get them to climb
into her car. The unforgiving landscape of northern Scotland makes a
striking backdrop, and the way the film unfolds, there is a repetition, a
cycle that we're watching play out over and over, and Glazer and his
co-writer Walter Campbell have done their best to remove anything that
might offer you an easy answer about what you're seeing.


As a result, it all ends up feeling like a nightmare. There are
mysterious figures on motorcycles who follow up whenever Johansson
finishes with one of the men she picks up, and there's one harrowing
sequence on a beach involving a baby that I may never fully shake.
Because Glazer doesn't offer you answers, it becomes an exercise in
tension. There's a moment where something happens and Johansson suddenly
shifts gears, and we can tell she's thrown off the system, even if we
don't fully understand the stakes or the consequences.


It is a gorgeous film, full of quiet beautiful images, and even at its
ugliest, I couldn't look away. Beyond that, I keep flashing on images
from the movie at random moments, and I suspect I'll need to see it a
few more times to really get a handle on it. "Under The Skin" is one of
the most difficult films I've seen this year, and I love the challenge
it poses for viewers. Here's hoping Glazer continues to follow his own
very personal muse, wherever it might lead him.
Read more at http://www.hitfix.com/motion-captured/review-scarlett-johansson-is-riveting-in-jonathan-glazers-hypnotic-under-the-skin#LiZgsABAXdogTzW5.99
"Under The Skin"
took me a few days to fully digest, and it was one of the few films I
didn't run back to immediately write about during the Toronto Film
Festival. I'm glad, too, because I'm not sure what review I would have
given the film the moment I walked out. The longer I've chewed on it,
the more I am impressed by what Glazer did. Fair warning, though… when I
use the word "hypnotic" to describe the film, I'm being precise. There
is something about the rhythm of the filmmaking, the score by Mica Levi,
the photography by Daniel Landin that all works together to cast a
powerful spell. During our mid-day screening at Toronto, I watched
people around me nodding off, doing that sudden head-bob thing where
they would start awake again, and this is a film that features
full-frontal nudity from Scarlett Johansson,
so that's sort of amazing. The film makes Nicolas Roeg's "The Man Who
Fell To Earth" look like "Independence Day" in terms of pace and oblique
storytelling, but it would also make a fascinating companion piece to
Roeg's movie. Both films deal with extraterrestrial visitors sent to
Earth to harvest very specific resources, but unless you read Michel
Farber's novel that Glazer's film is based on, you would never know the
specifics of what you're watching in the film.





Instead, Glazer has stripped the narrative bare, and what he's created
is something far more meditative and internal than I would have
expected. He shot the film using non-actors who were unaware they were
being filmed, all reacting to Johansson's efforts to get them to climb
into her car. The unforgiving landscape of northern Scotland makes a
striking backdrop, and the way the film unfolds, there is a repetition, a
cycle that we're watching play out over and over, and Glazer and his
co-writer Walter Campbell have done their best to remove anything that
might offer you an easy answer about what you're seeing.


As a result, it all ends up feeling like a nightmare. There are
mysterious figures on motorcycles who follow up whenever Johansson
finishes with one of the men she picks up, and there's one harrowing
sequence on a beach involving a baby that I may never fully shake.
Because Glazer doesn't offer you answers, it becomes an exercise in
tension. There's a moment where something happens and Johansson suddenly
shifts gears, and we can tell she's thrown off the system, even if we
don't fully understand the stakes or the consequences.


It is a gorgeous film, full of quiet beautiful images, and even at its
ugliest, I couldn't look away. Beyond that, I keep flashing on images
from the movie at random moments, and I suspect I'll need to see it a
few more times to really get a handle on it. "Under The Skin" is one of
the most difficult films I've seen this year, and I love the challenge
it poses for viewers. Here's hoping Glazer continues to follow his own
very personal muse, wherever it might lead him.
Read more at http://www.hitfix.com/motion-captured/review-scarlett-johansson-is-riveting-in-jonathan-glazers-hypnotic-under-the-skin#LiZgsABAXdogTzW5.99

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